5 sources for extra study

by / Wednesday, 16 October 2013
Youtube

The biggest collection of video and audio material on the web, Youtube is a great way to get extra listening practise related to whatever you are studying it in class – grammar, IELTS, English for business – it’s all here. See this link for Steve jobs’ famous iPhone launch:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vZYlhShD2oQ

 TED

TED.com has become one of the most popular sites on the internet. TED features cutting edge ideas by speakers at the forefront of their fields. Themes range from economics and healthcare to education and warfare. Here is the most watched talk, Ken Robinson’s engaging and inspiring ideas on getting the best from our young people:

http://www.ted.com/talks/ken_robinson_says_schools_kill_creativity.html

 Big Think

For more advanced students, Big Think features a host of cultural commentators and leading academics (e.g. Stephen Fry) who discuss the big questions, and themselves. Here’s Henry Rollins discussing his life choices and unusual career:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BkvEpoqFx6c

RSA animates

A spin off of the RSA lectures, the animates lectures (now becoming popular on many sites) are a great way of testing your listening skills with visual support, sometimes including the words themselves. Iain McGilchrist’s lecture on ‘the divided brain’ may challenge much of what you thought you knew:

http://www.thersa.org/events/rsaanimate/animate/rsa-animate-the-divided-brain

OU learn

The UK highly respected distance learning provider provides videos on a number of topics, including religion, philosophy and the English language itself! Terrifically entertaining education, more suited to higher level students because of the speed of the narration. Try a history of English in ten minutes if you are advanced:

http://www.open.edu/openlearn/history-the-arts/culture/english-language/the-history-english-ten-minutes

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